Items where Subject is "Modelmaking"

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Through a case study of the professionally made architectural model in Britain between the late 1960s and the early1990s, this article draws from archaeologist Ian Hodder’s concept of entanglement and argues that the relationship between the architect, the architectural model, and the modelmaker exists as an entangled web of shifting distributions of power governed by asymmetric tensions and mutual dependencies. In tracing the changing relationship dynamics that led to a dramatic broadening of the model’s visual styles to incorporate both realism and creative abstraction during this period, this article describes the professionally made architectural model as the locus of an intricate web of interconnected dependencies in which the model, the modelmaker, and the architect reap both the positive and negative consequences of their increasingly fraught entrapment. Demonstrating how a study of their entanglement reveals the complexities that exist within the human-object interactions that surround them, this article highlights the mutual dependencies that bind the model, the maker, and the architect together.

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Architectural modelmakers have long carried out their work hidden behind the scenes of architectural design, and in presenting a history of architectural modelmaking in Britain for the first time, this book casts a new light on their remarkable skills and achievements.

By telling the story of the modelmakers who make architectural models rather than architects who commission and use them, this book seeks to celebrate their often-overlooked contribution to the success and endurance of the architectural model in Britain over the past one hundred and forty years. Drawing from extensive archival research and interviews with practicing and retired modelmakers, this book traces the complete history of architectural modelmaking in Britain from its initial emergence as a specialist occupation at the end of the nineteenth century through to the present day. It reveals the legacy of John Thorp, the first professional architectural modelmaker in Britain, who opened his business in London in 1883, and charts the lives and careers of the innovative and creative modelmakers who followed him. It examines the continually evolving materials, tools, and processes of architectural modelmaking and outlines the profound ideological, economic, and technological influences that have shaped the profession’s development.

Illustrated with over one hundred photographs of architectural models from previously undocumented archives, this book will be of great interest to architectural modelmakers, academics, and historians, as well as anyone with an interest in architectural history and modelmaking.

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This thesis presents an historical account of the development of the professionally-made architectural model in Britain that aims to understand how the model came to be as it is today. With existing studies of the architectural model having been predominantly focused on its use within the design process and its cultural meanings, this thesis, in examining the architectural model from within the field of modelmaking rather than architecture, highlights developments in the making of architectural models as opposed to the dominant ‘post-production’ perspective that overlooks the role of the modelmaker and the materials and processes employed.
Drawing from extensive interviews with practicing and retired architectural modelmakers alongside historic documents and photographs from previously undocumented private archives, this thesis responds to Anna Fariello’s call for a ‘front-end’ consideration of objects that considers their making through its conceptualisation of the model’s contemporary form as an assemblage that emerged from the complex interactions between the various people, processes, materials, and ideas that have contributed to its history.
What this thesis reveals is how the contemporary form of the professionally-made architectural model in Britain emerged as a result of developments that took place during four distinct periods in its history: the initial emergence of architectural modelmaking as a distinct profession during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries; the adoption of plastics as the principal modelmaking materials during the post-war boom of the 1950s and early-1960s; the turbulent realignment of the model’s ‘stylistic palette’ during the 1970s and 1980s; and the introduction of advanced digital manufacturing technologies from the 1990s to the present day. This thesis further argues that the notion of adaptability – emerging from the combined agency of the modelmaker’s imaginative and ingenious intentions and the intrinsic adaptability of the materials, tools, and processes employed – has been the most significant influence that has shaped the overall development of the professionally-made architectural model in Britain.

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This thesis presents an historical account of the development of the professionally-made architectural model in Britain that aims to understand how the model came to be as it is today. With existing studies of the architectural model having been predominantly focused on its use within the design process and its cultural meanings, this thesis, in examining the architectural model from within the field of modelmaking rather than architecture, highlights developments in the making of architectural models as opposed to the dominant ‘post-production’ perspective that overlooks the role of the modelmaker and the materials and processes employed.
Drawing from extensive interviews with practicing and retired architectural modelmakers alongside historic documents and photographs from previously undocumented private archives, this thesis responds to Anna Fariello’s call for a ‘front-end’ consideration of objects that considers their making through its conceptualisation of the model’s contemporary form as an assemblage that emerged from the complex interactions between the various people, processes, materials, and ideas that have contributed to its history.
What this thesis reveals is how the contemporary form of the professionally-made architectural model in Britain emerged as a result of developments that took place during four distinct periods in its history: the initial emergence of architectural modelmaking as a distinct profession during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries; the adoption of plastics as the principal modelmaking materials during the post-war boom of the 1950s and early-1960s; the turbulent realignment of the model’s ‘stylistic palette’ during the 1970s and 1980s; and the introduction of advanced digital manufacturing technologies from the 1990s to the present day. This thesis further argues that the notion of adaptability – emerging from the combined agency of the modelmaker’s imaginative and ingenious intentions and the intrinsic adaptability of the materials, tools, and processes employed – has been the most significant influence that has shaped the overall development of the professionally-made architectural model in Britain.

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